February 13th, 2003

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FYI

If you want to feel overwhelmed, depressed, panicked.... go to

http://www.fema.gov

I have some friends who are "getting prepared" and it led me to go look at all the lovely information on how to deal with just about any type of "situation."

My opinion, they need to come up with a guide targeting fatalists or real people because I can't believe the ridiculously long supply list they put on there. Like hello, I guess hardware stores, Johnson & Johnson, water bottlers, and supermarkets really do great in all this but sorry, most people can't fill a closet with 20 boxes of supplies so they can hunker down for a month...

Sigh. I better shut up.
  • Current Music
    "Burning Down the House"
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Blizzard of '78

So this week marks the 25th ANNIVERSARY of the Blizzard of '78! Wow! Whoo hoo! I can now look back on 25th anniversaries and say "I was there and REMEMBER it!"

I'm telling you, that blizzard seriously skewed my idea of snow while I was growing up (in Massachusetts, BTW) since as a little kid, I had seen THAT and just though that was NORMAL. The street I grew up on had special islands where 3-4 houses would be set off from the main road; the islands were basically little stands of pineforest and ALSO great places for the plows to push a lot of the snow, thus avoiding blocking driveways. I'm telling you, the snow pile that year was like 20 ft. high. I went sledding down them and my brother made a HUGE tunnel. I was a big little kid (well, duh!) but it was too much for me even :)

For those looking for background info, saying "What blizzard?" here is some info:


Well, the January 1978 snow storm started slowly, but as the day moved along, things deteriorated rapidly. Gusty winds, low visibility, blowing and drifting snow added to the complications. Buses, cars, and airplanes were grinded to a halt. Schools and businesses had to be closed. People had to rush out to the store to get essential food and supplies while wondering when the snow was going to end. Those who had to travel far were left stranded in many roads that were unable to be plowed. Emergency personnel were strapped down with emergencies as the snow continued to pile up.

Snow drifts had piled up over 3 feet while snow amounts had ranged from 12 to 18 inches. New York City had been hit with approximately 17 inches of the white stuff. There were also a few snowstorms after that particular one in 1978 which left many residents worried about the future, and having to educated and protect themselves in future snowstorms and blizzards in years ahead. In terms of history, the Blizzard of 1978 was the first storm of the modern age to affect the New York City area.

Meanwhile, in New England, things were much worse. The storm pounded the region for two days with over two feet of snow. It claimed 54 lives, destroyed about 2,000 homes, and drove approximately 10,000 people into storm shelters. A total of $1 billion dollars in damage was left behind by the storm. In a very symbolic picture of what the storm did in New England, one just had to look on Route 128 where 3,500 cars and trucks stranded with their owners after the blinding snow simply overwhelmed them. There were snow drifts of up to 15 feet in some areas of New England. This added to snow that was already on the ground at the time from a previous storm.

Massachussetts was especially hard hit. A State of Emergency was declared and Army and National Guard troops were brought in to assist in the clean-up operation. Driving was forbidden for almost a week so people had to find other ways to get around. In addition, supplies and food were low. People were in desperate need of necessities. However, the spirit of the residents of the Northeast was not damaged. People helped each other dig out. Everybody pulled together to overcome the devastation caused by the disaster.



More info:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=blizzard+of+1978&btnG=Google+Search
  • Current Music
    "Bizarre Love Triangle," New Order
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Rated G TMI

Never before revealed:

For about 20 years, any time I read a book, magazine, newspaper article, my mind automatically counts the first ten and last ten lines of text. Like, I'll be reading and then say "Oh, this is the 10th from last line on this page." I have no idea how this got started but boy, it's pretty high up there on my list of pointless personal quirks. At least I don't do it when reading email or the web. Well, not yet anyway.
  • Current Music
    Madonna