August 12th, 2008

ice cream

German Laws and Language

For the fun of it / out of interest, I looked into German citizenship.

It turns out that they have changed their old law (1914-2000) that let grandchildren etc. apply. Now it is limited to people with German parents or people with relatives who were forced to leave Germany under the Nazis. I'm sure they revised it due to immigration concerns etc. Since both my grandparents left Germany during the 1920s, for non-political reasons, I'm not eligible. (Most of my English relatives left England long, long before there was a United States. My first relative here was a Lord, tee hee!)

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In looking at the laws, I came across this curious example of sexism. Interesting because earlier today Caleb was telling me about Italy's laws on such matters and it seems to be the opposite. But here is what Germany.info says:

If you were born before January 1, 1975:
  • If your parents were married at the time of your birth you acquired German citizenship if your father was German; you did not acquire German citizenship if only your mother was German (unless you would otherwise have been stateless).
  • If your parents were not married at the time of your birth you acquired German citizenship if your mother was German; you did not acquire German citizenship if only your father was German.

So if your parents are MARRIED and your dad is German, you are German. But if only your mom is German, you are not German. BUT if they were not married and your mom was German, then you are. WTF?

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Finally, over on the German language portion of the site, I tried to read some details but was turned off by words like:

Staatsangehörigkeit
Bundesverwaltungsamt
Staatsangehörigkeitsbehörde
Staatsangehörigkeitsgesetzes
Verfahrensablauf
Staatsangehörigkeitsausweis

German, for those who don't know, is really big on compound words. There's no word too long that can't be made longer! So "Staatsangehörigkeitsgesetzes" means "country + belongingness + rules" a.k.a "citizenship rules." and "Staatsangehörigkeitsausweis" means (I believe) "country + belongingness + proof" a.k.a. "proof of citizenship." This is why, years ago when I was looking up info on Germany's tech visa program, I got stuck. Technical German Bureaucratese is nearly indecipherable!
sideview, obamame_sideview

Wo sind Ihre Beibehaltungsgenehmigungen?

Earlier today I mentioned the horrors of the German I encountered while looking up citizenship info. For fun, I've run some of it through Google Translate specifically a bunch of the most horrific words.

German | Google Translate

Staatsangehörigkeit | Nationality

Staatsangehörigkeitsbehörde | National Authority

Sammeleinbürgerungen | ? [I believe this is resettlement / exile)

Personenstandsurkunden | Marital Status Certificates

Wohnsitznachweise | Proof of Residence

Negativbescheinigung | Negative Certificate

Bundesverwaltungsamt | Federal Office of Administration

Abkömmlinge | Descendents

Einbürgerungsbewerber | Naturalization Applicants

Aufenthaltsverordnung | Residence Regulation

Staatsangehörigkeitsrechts | Nationality Law

Ermessensentscheidung | Discretionary Decision

Beibehaltungsgenehmigungen | Maintaining Permits

Auslandsvertretung | Diplomatic Mission

Deutschkenntnisse | German Knowledge

The cool thing is, almost all these words are actually obvious if you know what the component parts are. In German you can make compound words almost w/o trying: word + word + word = word. It just means the words are LONG.
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Healey

Poplar Street

Around 50 yds. from my building. I love this street, esp. at night. The building at right is the U.S. Court of Appeals building, which is Beaux Arts style granite.

2008

Despite all the sub-par aspects and the street people, my neighborhood has some very attractive qualities.
Tongue

The Republic of Republican Freedom Fighters

As earlier reported here, Georgia legislators are in a push to makes sure people can carry their guns around with them pretty much everywhere. Recently they made them legal on public transportation and in restaurants. Now the news is guns at college and church. As long as you have a permit. Ah, great.

At least Atlanta was able to win the battle to keep guns out of the airport.

Things could be worse. I could be in that OTHER Georgia.
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